Pedal

Thursday, May 27th

Jock Docs: Cycling

Pedal

Peter Sutherland, 2001, 56 minutes

A fast-paced documentary film about surviving in the streets of New York City as a bicycle messenger. It features messengers from all walks of life as they battle traffic in a race to make their next delivery on time. Directed by Peter Sutherland and produced by Ana Lombardo, Pedal the documentary lets viewers live the spectacle of the delivery itself. It premiered in 2001 at the South by Southwest film festival, and was later acquired by the Sundance channel, where it aired until 2004.

 

A Sunday in Hell

Wednesday, May 26th, 7:30 pm 

Jock Docs: Cycling

A Sunday In Hell

Jorgen Leth, 1976, 111 minutes

This is a bike-fanatics dream of a movie, portraying the discipline and heroism of the winners alongside the painfull realisation of own limits of the losers. The race takes place in the northern parts of France and lower countryside of Belgium, with a spectacular finish on the old stadium of Roubaix. Shot with 20 cameras and a helicopter, you can see every bead of sweat on the cyclists and every smashed-up ankle. Considered to be one of the best cycling films ever made.

 

Homeward: A Screening Series Exploring the Concept of Home

Homeward: A Screening Series Exploring the Concept of Home

Curated by Denisse Andrade

Sponsored by Third World Newsreel

May 20th-21st

The lack of a home may be different than a lack of home; this series addresses the meaning of home and the definitions individuals, cities, nations and cultures work with when referring to such concept. Themes ofdisplacement, (im)migration, uneven development, autonomous spaces, architecture and memory are recurring in the program.

Thursday, May 20th, 7:30pm

 

Doña Ana

Marlon Vásquez Silva, David Sanchez, 2 min.

Animation, Colombia

Ana is a woman who sells medicinal plants in the city of Medellín ,Colombia. While she eats strawberries and talks about their properties, we find out much more.

Here to Stay  

 

Mansee Kong, 2008, 7 min.

Documentary, USA

Illustrates the effects of gentrification in Manhattan’s Chinatown as anelderly man and fellow tenants in an endangered single-room occupancy building await the results of an anti-eviction lawsuit

Cusps

 

Sara Zia Ebrahimi, 2008, 14 min.

Documentary, USA

In this personal documentary Sara Zia Ebrahimi explores her experiences livingas an urban nomad and immigrant in the post-industrial landscape of Philadelphia.

The documentary first began exploring the role artists play in gentrification.

Four Places Like Home

 

Simone Viger, 2008, 4 min.

Documentary, Canada

Do you know the history of your home?  How much of the past can be read? This portrait of a neighborhood travels to four different reconverted buildings in the South West region ofMontreal, presenting varied notions of home.

Tactical Tourist

 

Dara Greenwald, 2007, 14 min. 

USA

A DIY portrait of the squatting movement in Barcelona, Spain.  A tourist walks through the city led by squatters – the tour points out buildings turned from abandoned or speculative properties into communal homes and radical cultural spaces.  

 

Dear Tourist

Cristian Bermudez, 2006, 7 min.

Video letter, Costa Rica

An ordinary house in an ordinary suburb was painted in white and fuchsia colorstripes. A year later, a letter was sent to the neighbors explaining the reasons forthis choice. The same letter was used as script for this film that deals with issues such as identity, immigration and the use of art out of the white cube.

2 Home Movies

 

Masha Godovannaya, 2009, 9 min.

Experimental documentary, Russia

One can say with some certainty that all of us,with cameras–have shot home movies in their lives.

Now, imagine how a home moviewould look like if it was shot inWarsaw Ghetto at the beginning of 1940s by a German worker during this vacation… 

 

No Place Like Home

Supafriends, Global Action Project, 2009, 1 min.

PSA, USA

A public service announcement focusing on homelessness among LGBTQ youth. 

Featuring a conversation with Rob Robinson, of Picture the Homeless, filmmakers and others TBA.

 

Friday, May 21, 7:30pm

Ici Et La-Bas(Here and There)

Natalia Rodriguez, 2003, 20 min.

Documentary, France

An immigrant couple in France see their daughters becoming French. In this home of double culture, hopes of going back still exist.

 

The Cost of Separation

Liz Miller, 2009, 9 min.

Documentary, Canada

“The Cost of Separation” highlights the daily effects of prolonged separation from family members on three parents with refugee status in Canada.

Still

 

Alana Kakoyiannis, 2009, 18 min.

Documentary, Cyprus

A poetic documentary reflecting on the notion of home through the lens of Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriotdisplacement on the dividedisland of Cyprus. The testimonies of twofemale voices living on opposingsides of the Green Line combined with the filmmaker's own observations ofthe present day, capture the potency ofthe political conflict throughpersonal perspectives.

 

Disillusionment

Voices of Women Media, 2007, 12 min.

Video portraits, The Netherlands 

Migrant women flee their homelands in search of a new country offering security,freedom and peace. They leave families and their cultures behind for a chance to improve their political and personal situations. In February 2007, undocumented migrant women residing illegally in a housing shelter in The Netherlands were given media tools to create six intimate videoportraits offering a brief glimpse into this transient period oftheir lives.

 

Steel Homes

Eva Weber, 2008, 10 min.

Documentary, UK

A poetic exploration of memory and loss, Steel Homes takes the viewer inside the world of a self-storage warehouse, uncovering the hiddent treasures andsecrets behind closed doors.

Warm Place Tonight

 

Nic Bettauer, 1996, 7 min.

Documentary, USA

This film documents two homeless men’s Sisyphean struggle to safe the life of their friend on thestreets of downtown Los Angeles. The film expresses the men’s feelings ofhelplessness, hopelessness and powerlessness tied to their grief, loss and homelessness.

 

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase

Sunday, May 16th 

7:30 pm

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase

Gregory Isaacs: Live at the Rocket

Dir. Dan Crouch (2003) 40 min.

Gregory Isaacs, the smooth crooner of Lovers' Rock performs a long list of classics and new hits before a capacity crowd.

8:30 pm

Rockers

Dir. Ted Bafaloukos (1978) 100 min.

Jamaican Patois with English subtitles

In the history of Jamaican cinema Rockers is a close second to The Harder They Come as a crucial depiction of the politics and culture of its time. 

Legendary session drummer Leroy "Horsemouth" Wallace is the main character in a plot loosely resembling De Sica's Bicycle Thief. But the story is secondary to the documentation of a political and cultural context in which a new musical form, Steppers, emerged. With the increase in political violence on the island, the Steppers or Rockers beat appeared as a more rapid, militant variation on Reggae. Peter Tosh's anthem "Stepping Razor" is characterizes the role played by the many of the all star cast (including Big Youth, Jacob Miller and Burning spear) as cultural warriors fighting for recognition, against a racial elite and for basic survival.

 

Lava 1 & 2's Extravaganza Graf Art Exhibit

Saturday, May 15th, 7:00pm

Lava 1 & 2's Extravaganza Graf Art Exhibit

For everybody who thought grafitti started in the early 80's, Lava AKA StraightMan is here to set the records straight, man. LAVA 1&2 (he claimed 2 so no one else could - don't even think about the URL, cause he got that too) started writing in 1970 when we wasn't taking care of business as Supreme Commander of all Captains of the Black Spades in the borough of Manhattan or creating the first Hip Hop Flyers with PHASE 2. The Black Spades went on to become Zulu Nation and Graf blew up in the 80's but a whole generation of pioneers stayed in the shadows. LAVA'a Extravaganza gives a who's who of 70's writers s a chance to shine.

Special Guests: SONIC, REE, PRIZ, DOSE, INK76, CRANE, STAN, BAMA, CORNBREAD, NIC 707, CLYDE, KET, STAYHIGH149, SEN-ONE, TRACY168, MIKE171, SJK, RIFF170, FLINT707, BOM5, COCO144, JAMESTOP, SPAR, FDT56, & SELO456.

Hosted by "STRAIGHTMAN", Music by D.J. CHUCK CITY

 

Documentaries in Bloom: New Films Presented by Livia Bloom

Wednesday, May 12th - Friday, May 14th 7 pm

Documentaries in Bloom: New Films Presented by Livia Bloom

The Philosopher Kings

Dir. Patrick Shen, 2009, 70 min.

In search of wisdom found in unlikely places, The Philosopher Kings travels the halls of prestigious colleges and universities across America to learn from the staff members who see it all and have been through it all: the janitors. This thought-provoking, feature-length documentary weaves together the untold stories of triumph and tragedy from the members of society who are often disregarded and ignored, and seeks out the kind of wisdom that gets them through the day. "Most of us know what it feels like to have something to say and no opportunity to share it. The Philosopher Kings reveals what happens when seemingly "ordinary" people, who have never had an opportunity to speak publicly, openly share their experiences and the things they care most deeply about," says director Patrick Shen. 

Thursday, May 13th, 7:00 pm

 

Documentaries in Bloom: New Films Presented by Livia Bloom

The Philosopher Kings

Dir. Patrick Shen, 2009, 70 min

 

Friday, May 14th, 7:00 pm

Documentaries in Bloom: New Films Presented by Livia Bloom

The Philosopher Kings

Dir. Patrick Shen, 2009, 70 min

 

Docs on Nukes: Nuclear Narratives through the art of film

Sunday, May 9th 5pm

The People's Choice

Selected by Kathleen Sullivan, in celebration of Mothers Day.

Docs on Nukes — nuclear narratives through the art of film

Witness to Hiroshima

Dir. Kathy Sloane (2010) 16 min.

Japanese citizen Keiji Tsuchiya, using his 12 powerful watercolors, recounts his experiences in Hiroshima as a 17-year-old soldier immediately following the dropping of the atomic bomb, and relates those experiences to his subsequent life-long commitment to saving the Japanese horseshoe crab and its habitat.

And Special Sneak Preview:

Atomic Mom. 

Dir. M.T. Silvia (2010) 87 min.

Atomic Mom is a documentary about two women, both mothers, who have opposite experiences of the atomic bomb. After decades of silence, a daughter's quest for truth leads to the exchange of an olive branch between an American Scientist and a Hiroshima Survivor.

Post screening panel discussion with filmmakers, Kathy Sloane and M.T. Silvia and Kathleen Sullivan, PhD, Program Director of Hibakusha Stories.

Bring your mom, bring your friends, bring your anti-nuclear family.

 

Under the Flag of the Rising Sun

Saturday, May 8th 7:30 pm

Faux Real

Curated by Kevin Jarvis

Under the Flag of the Rising Sun

(Gunki hatameku motoni)

Dir. Kinji Fukasaku, 1972, 96 min.

Of the many fine films by Kinji Fukasaku released, Under the Flag of the Rising Sun is arguably the most unforgettable. Fukasaku claimed this was the film that crystallized his signature visual style, employing color, black and white, freeze-frames, negative images, documentary photographs, and shocking violence to tell the powerful story of a long-grieving widow in contemporary early 1970s Japan (Sachiko Hidari), still struggling to determine the truth behind her husband's court martial and execution on the New Guinea front during the final days of World War II. As she interviews surviving members of her husband's garrison in an effort to clear his name, a Rashomon-like tapestry of conflicting testimony unfolds to form a harrowing, collage of wartime atrocity, endurance, and survival by any means necessary.

 

Harlem Homegrown

Friday, May 7th 7:30 pm

Harlem Homegrown

Luther T. Jones

George Lamboy (1991) 60 min.

Released the same year as Spike Lee's glossy Jungle Fever, the verite gem Luther T. Jones, tells the story of a Harlem based black man and his fetish for white women. However, in the end through a series of bittersweet, comic events Jones comes to appreciate the girl next door. Shot in and around Harlem in real apartments, local nightclubs, bars and parks Luther T. Jones evokes early 90s, real deal NYC perhaps on a level that most films (documentary or narrative) can't claim. Luther T. Jones features James Dickson as the title character. Dickson, a Harlem resident, has appeared in a wide range of stage, screen, and television productions including We Wear the Masques, New Jack City and The Cosby Show.  Stars Dickson as well as Lorin Johanson, Jessie Eccles, Carole Lynn Oswald.

Q&A with James Dixon

 

Docwatchers

Monday, May 3rd, 7:00pm

Docwatchers

Curated by Hellura Lyle

Three Short Documentaries

!VALA!: The Power of Black Students at Columbia University 1968-2008  

 

Kamau Suttles, 2008, 28 min.

On April 23, 1968, African American students risked their academic standing, future careers, and possibly their lives, when they took over the Hamilton Hall Building at Columbia University.  VALA! tells the real story of well-organized rebellion which was staged to protest the Vietnam War and the university’s proposed construction of a gymnasium in Harlem.

 

Freddy Ilanga: Che's Swahili Translator

Katrin Hansing, 2009, 24 min.

In April 1965, Freddy Ilanga, a fifteen-year-old Congolese youth became Che Guevara’s personal Swahili teacher and translator, during Guevara’s secret mission in the Congo to train anti-Mobutu rebels. After seven intense months by Che Guevara’s side, the Cuban authorities sent Freddy to Cuba. During his early years, Freddy thought that his stay in Cuba would be temporary. However, 40 years passed during which time he lost all contact with his family and homeland.

Keep On Steppin’

 

Christine Noschese, 2008 25 min.

Originally founded in Harlem as an alternative to “sitting around and complaining about their aches and pains,” the Steppers dance company has become a source of strength for the dancers that has empowered them to persevere through the inevitable tragedies of life.

 

Q&A with Directors & Reception to Follow Screening

 

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase

Sunday, May 2nd, 7:30 pm

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase

Gregory Isaacs: Live at the Rocket

Dir. Dan Crouch (2003) 40 min.

Gregory Isaacs, the smooth crooner of Lovers' Rock performs a long list of classics and new hits before a capacity crowd.

8:15pm

Rockers

Dir. Ted Bafaloukos (1978) 100 min.

Jamaican Patois with English subtitles

In the history of Jamaican cinema Rockers is a close second to The Harder They Come as a crucial depiction of the politics and culture of its time. 

Legendary session drummer Leroy "Horsemouth" Wallace is the main character in a plot loosely resembling De Sica's Bicycle Thief. But the story is secondary to the documentation of a political and cultural context in which a new musical form, Steppers, emerged. With the increase in political violence on the island, the Steppers or Rockers beat appeared as a more rapid, militant variation on Reggae. Peter Tosh's anthem "Stepping Razor" is characterizes the role played by the many of the all star cast (including Big Youth, Jacob Miller and Burning spear) as cultural warriors fighting for recognition, against a racial elite and for basic survival.

 

MOVE

Sunday, May 2nd at 1pm and 3pm

MOVE movie

MOVE

(Dir. Ben Garry and Ryan McKenna, 2004, 55 min.)

A documentary detailing the controversial history of the radical African-American commune, MOVE. Narrated by Howard Zinn and woven with interviews and archival material, thisfilm foregrounds issues of Black identity, separatist living, political racism, and police brutality that have become part of a contentious national debate since the 1985 Philadelphiafire-bombing.

Ramona Afrika the only Adult survivor of the Bombing of the MOVE house will be present at the screenings to respond to any questions, as well as other members of the MOVE family whose parents are still in prison after 30yrs.

 

 

 

Les Annees 80

Wednesday, April 28th, 7:30pm

(A Tribute to Chantal Akerman)

Les années 80

Akerman, 82 min, 1983, VHS projection

One of Akerman’s most remarkable and essential films is not currently available in any subtitled form, so will be screened on VHS. The soft blur of the VHS format works well, though, for this impressionistic study of women’s voices and bodies, in Akerman’s beautifully edited film about film, consisting of footage of auditions for a musical she was attempting to make. “Considering Akerman’s craving to make a commercially successful film, it’s ironic that she gave the same French title, Les années 80, to both a feature-length preview of the musical she was trying to raise money for in 1983 (shown here as The Golden Eighties) and the finished musical that she finally made three years later (known in English as Window Shopping) — which certainly didn’t help matters much. It’s no less ironic that the preview — which consists of an hour of videotaped auditions with actresses, followed by 25 minutes of sample scenes from the movie in 35-millimeter — proves in many ways to be more emotionally affecting than the completed work.  –Jonathan Rosenbaum

 

 

The Long Take

Tuesday, April 27th, 7:30pm

(The Long Take)

Recréations  

Claire Simon, 54 min, 1993, Beta

In this should-be cult classic director Claire Simon shoots a group of French school children on a playground from their point of view, Peanuts-style, and keeps the camera on their games almost uncomfortably too long, past cute and to the point of shocking hilarity. Their specific shared fantasy world is revealed to be a dark, complex system of haves and have-nots, mitigated by unreasonable loyalties. And the differences between the girls’ games and the boys’ are remarkable.

(Special Sneak Preview)

A Little Death

Gina Telaroli, 79 min, 2009, DV

A debut feature film directed by Telaroli and made by Meerkat Media collective, who make films collaboratively and democratically emphasizing that process and methods are as important as the end result. Cinema aficionado Telaroli made a decision to consciously transpose some of the specific cinematic choices made by 70s art house auteurs such as Chantal Akerman, but highlighting the unique textures and capabilities of using digital instead of film. Comprised of just 28 shots, this stylistically rigorous look at a young woman's ritualistic experience spending a solitary three-months in winter, while caretaking a summerhouse in Nantucket, is a direct confrontation to media stereotypes of sex-confessional based female relationships.

 

Softcore and Sexual Subjects (not Objects)

Monday, April 26th, 7:30pm

(Softcore and Sexual Subjects (not Objects))

Female Sensibility

 

Lynda Benglis, 14 min, 1973

Sandy Toes

 

Maximilla Lukacs, 4 min, 2009

 

Fuses

Carolee Schneeman, 22min, 1967

 

No. 4

Yoko Ono, 6 min, 1966

 

Lust

Valie Export, 12 min, 1986

 

Plus collection of clips from various softcore, pre-code, and other narrative films

How do women become sexual subjects instead of objects, with agency, imagination and authenticity? A selection of shorts and clips, followed by a discussion, will show various stunning examples of how this has been and can be accomplished.

 

 

Keeling's Caribbean Showcase

Sunday, April 25th, 8:30pm 

Keeling’s Caribbean Showcase

Reggae: The Story of Jamaican Music

Dir. Mike Connolly, 2004, 90 min.

This documentary uses clips, interviews, and musical performances to examine the evolution of reggae music, which was born on the streets of Jamaica and spread through America, Europe, and eventually the world. The popular artists of reggae, whose presence is still felt today, ultimately created a lasting impression and went on to influence a wide variety of musical styles including rock and hip hop.

10:30 pm

Best of Reggae Sunsplash (1982)

Reggae Sunsplash is the brainchild of four Jamaicans, Tony Johnson, Don Green, Ronnie Burke and John Wakeling. Beginning in the summer of 1978, Sunsplash and the great reggae artists it featured is credited for generating tourism in Jamaica during the summer, traditionally a dead season. This collection of performances by The Mighty Diamonds, Yellow Man, Dean Fraser, Eek-A-Mouse and many more captures the festival at its apex.

 

 

Coffee Colored Children

Sunday, April 25th, 5:00pm

(Subjective Histories)

Coffee Colored Children

 

Ngozi, Onwurah, 15 min, 1988, DVD

We Want Roses, Too

 

Alina Marazzi, 85 min, 2008, beta

A documentary that tells the history of feminism in Italy in the 60's and 70's through diaries, illustrated romance novels, pop songs, home movies and other found footage. The style is the content; the filmmaker's rejection of objectivity and insistence on shaping history through a private and emotional point–of–view was in part what differentiated Italian feminism from the women's movement in Britain and America. For Italian feminists, communication had to take new feminine forms and the personal was highly political.

Following the screening will be a panel discussion on “Feminine Aesthetics and the Fourth Wave of Feminism”

 

Carmen and Geoffrey

Friday, April 23rd, 7:30pm

***National Dance Week Screening!***

Carmen and Geoffrey

 

Linda Atkinson and Nick Doob, 2006, 79 Minutes

This film is about the work of American artists, Carmen de Lavallade and Geoffrey Holder who stepped forward in the 1950's to play a vital part in the newly energized world of modern dance.  It is also about a forty-seven year long marriage and creative partnership that has sustained their accomplishments. Born in New Orleans, Carmen won a scholarship at age 16 to study in Los Angeles with the pioneering choreographer, Lester Horton.  She brought her high school classmate, Alvin Ailey to his first dance class.  Noticed by Herbert Ross, she appeared he invited her and Ailey to dance in the Broadway production of Truman Capote’s House of Flowers.  Another member of that cast was Geoffrey Holder.  They were married soon after. Geoffrey Holder came from Trinidad to debut in House of Flowers, which he also co-choreographed with Herbert Ross.  Later he directed and designed the costumes for The Wiz winning two Tonys in the process.  Geoffrey’s world-class talent as a painter has been recognized with a Guggenheim fellowship and he is a prize-winning author and photographer. The film provides young people with role models of lives boldly lived and above all will offer a paradigm for survival and accomplishment in one of the toughest professions to which anyone can aspire. - First Run Features

 

 

 

An Immigrant Heritage Week Screening

Wednesday, April 21st, 7:30pm

Media Matters Presents: 

An Immigrant Heritage Week Screening

By-Standing: The Beginning of an American Lifetime

Dir. Karen Lin, 2007, 5 min.

Kelly Tsai speaks truth to power as she raises her voice against war and complacency.

 

Vision Test

Dir. Wes Kim, 2003, 6 min.

Vision Test is a satire highlighting issues of race, gender and stereotypes based on a study of racial bias conducted by The Committee of 100.

Immersion

Dir. Richard Levien, 2009, 12 min.

Moises, a ten-year-old student, struggles to communicate in his new school with limited access to his native language.

 

15 min. discussion on "American Identity"

 

Exiled in America

Dir. Angela Torres Camarena, 2009, 9 min.

Five siblings struggle to support their American livelihoods after their mother is deported to Mexico.

The Sixth Section

Dir. Alex Rivera, 2004, 8 min.

During the cold winters of upstate New York, a group of immigrants work together to give back to their hometown of Boqueron, Mexico.

Slip of the Tongue

Dir. Karen Lum, 2006, 4 min. 

"What's your ethnic makeup? A young man makes a pass at a beautiful stranger and gets an eye-opening schooling on race and gender.

 

10 min. Action Break on "Immigration Reform"

 

10 min. Intermission

A Nomad’s Life

Dirs. Lynn True and Nelson Walker, 2008, 9 min. 

A young Tibetan family questions whether their nomadic traditions can survive against the challenges of a rapidly modernizing world.

African Underground: Hip Hop in Senegal

Dirs. Magee McIlvaine, Ben Herson, and Chris Moore, 2008, 6 min.

Step into the African Underground and listen as a new voice inspired by religion, politics, Hip Hop and Senagalese culture.

 

Why Do White People Have Black Spots?

Dir. Anya Kandel, 2009, 6 min. 

Youth in Ghana pose questions to people outside of their borders and spark an ongoing dialogue through film.

The Next Wave

Dirs. Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger, 2009, 8 min.

The Carteret islanders struggle to relocate as some of the world's first climate change refugees.

 

20 min. Discussion on "Social Media and It's Impact"